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You are watching: 2001 toyota sienna fuel pump location


It is located in the fuel tank. Not to hard to do, especially with lesser fuel in the tank...but a much greater challenge if AWD, as driveshaft must be removed. Why are you asking of its location? They last quite a while, unless abuse happens, i.e. constantly leaving tank below 1/4 level, bad/poor fuel usage, northern states" corrosion process.Just asking, but definitely more detail as to why would be nice. Hope that helped.
It is located in the fuel tank. Not to hard to do, especially with lesser fuel in the tank...but a much greater challenge if AWD, as driveshaft must be removed. Why are you asking of its location? They last quite a while, unless abuse happens, i.e. constantly leaving tank below 1/4 level, bad/poor fuel usage, northern states" corrosion process.Just asking, but definitely more detail as to why would be nice. Hope that helped.
i"m asking for my dad, he wants to replace it. how do we access the fuel tank? where is it? please let me know. thank you!
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If it is working fine than leave the fuel pump alone. It is not a thing to replace if it working fine as far as maintenance.
Our problem is the van is taking a long time to turn over. It kicks and kicks and kicks then it’ll turn over. We just replaced the starter, made sure the battery is fine, alternator etc. can someone please tell us how to access the fuel pump, fuel tank.
You would need to get the van high enough off the ground to access and drop the fuel tank. The fuel pump access is on top of the tank. The less fuel the easier it will be to handle the tank!If you"re having a hard to start problem(turns over won"t start). You first want to determine what you are NOT getting Fuel or Fire(Spark). then continue your diagnostics from there.You may be better off getting a professional diagnoses. Then, if you feel capable do the work yourself.
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Yes, there"s no sense replacing a fuel pump just because you suspect it might be bad. Take a pressure reading at the fuel rail and know whether it"s good or bad!
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Our problem is the van is taking a long time to turn over. It kicks and kicks and kicks then it’ll turn over. We just replaced the starter, made sure the battery is fine, alternator etc. can someone please tell us how to access the fuel pump, fuel tank.
What "kicks and kicks and kicks". You have a ground issue IMHO. I am not going to give you any advise on how the replace the fuel pump because I don"t think that is your problem. Starters are not a problem on the 2011-2019 Siennas. I have never heard of a fuel pump going.EDIT: Sorry If this comes off as being rude.
Cheapest way to test for fuel, take off the fuel line going into the fuel rail and crank the engine. If you get a nice strong several feet of fuel spray, then your fuel pump is most likely okay. Otherwise, get a fuel pressure gauge to get a more accurate reading.
Yes, there"s no sense replacing a fuel pump just because you suspect it might be bad. Take a pressure reading at the fuel rail and know whether it"s good or bad!
Not that it relates to a 2013. But I know the newer Siennas come with direct injection. Be careful, the newer models with Direct Injection can hurt you. Direct Injection isn"t like fuel injection where it"s anywhere from 40-60 psi at idle on both sides, DI has a low pressure and high pressure side. The low pressure side is 40-60 psi, but the high pressure side can be as high as 2200 psi or more. In saying this, DI fuel systems also have two fuel pumps. You have the in-tank fuel pump and you have the high pressure fuel pump in the engine bay typically by the fuel rail. If you"re not familiar with DI, I"d take it to a mechanic to troubleshoot.

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Cheapest way to test for fuel, take off the fuel line going into the fuel rail and crank the engine. If you get a nice strong several feet of fuel spray, then your fuel pump is most likely okay. Otherwise, get a fuel pressure gauge to get a more accurate reading.Not that it relates to a 2013. But I know the newer Siennas come with direct injection. Be careful, the newer models with Direct Injection can hurt you. Direct Injection isn"t like fuel injection where it"s anywhere from 40-60 psi at idle on both sides, DI has a low pressure and high pressure side. The low pressure side is 40-60 psi, but the high pressure side can be as high as 2200 psi or more. In saying this, DI fuel systems also have two fuel pumps. You have the in-tank fuel pump and you have the high pressure fuel pump in the engine bay typically by the fuel rail. If you"re not familiar with DI, I"d take it to a mechanic to troubleshoot.
Yep, the high pressure pump can be a killerThat being said, I wouldn"t jump on the fuel pump as being the issue.On newer Toyota"s it"s rather common for a sticky VVT-i solenoid to cause the same no start issue (especially if the oil change interval has been neglected or the wrong grade of oil used)Basically, the solenoid needs to engergize and advance the timing during initial start up.With old oil, the solenoid would tend to stick after the engine has shut down and hold the timing in a retarded position until after the engine has cranked over several times and oil pressure helps the solenoid to actuate.Had the same problem in my Scion XB beater.The PO had replaced the VVT-i solenoid with some aftermarket garbage and it would randomly have a long start issue, sometimes taking 30 seconds of cranking or longer before finally starting.Once it started, it would run fine and start with ease when warm, but have the same issue on the next cold start.Took the solenoid out and sure enough it was gunked up.Cleaned it, put it back in and it went a few weeks before it happened again, so I just ordered up an OEM replacement and she was good to go :smile:Other causes could be a vacuum leak or perhaps a loose air ductJust go through the proper testing procedure before throwing parts at it cause it would suck to go through the hassle and expense of installing a new fuel pump only to realize that it wasn"t the problem in the first place :-X